Dead branches stick and poke at Xmas fun

Irene Sheen

Nothing represents the winter holiday season more than watching the blue garbage truck haul away the decaying, “memory-filled” Christmas tree.

Nearly 15 million of these plants annually wind up in the landfill according to the National Environmental Education Foundation

As a dedicated plant mom, my family’s first and only real tree, purchased the previous year, convinced me of the drawbacks of caring for a leeching organism that dehydrates our water bills.

While for the typical American family, shopping for such a Yuletide log has become a spirited ritual if not the highlight of the season, I don’t mind that my family’s tradition is rooted in our annual dig into our garage where our $40 white stubby 4-foot purchase awaits its debut back into our cramped living room. 

Although the idea of a pine-scented grandiose tree sounds tempting, my family prioritizes environmental consciousness over superficial decorations.

A yearly purchase of a real, 7-foot towering monstrosity is one that the Sheen family will never willingly add onto our measly holiday budget; buy one fake guy, and we’re good for another 10 years.

So this holiday season, go plastic that will save not only family expenses, but also warm the hearts of my fellow plant enthusiasts.