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The Accolade

The Student News Site of Sunny Hills High School

The Accolade

The Student News Site of Sunny Hills High School

The Accolade

I Got My Sound Chicken restaurant in Amerige Heights Town Center lives up to its name

I+Got+My+Sound+Chicken%2C+which+opened+in+October+2023+in+Fullerton%E2%80%99s+Amerige+Town+Center+near+Sunny+Hills%2C+offers+eye-catching+neon+lights+and+Instagram-worthy+decorations+for+those+looking+for+Korean+street+food.
Claire Lee
I Got My Sound Chicken, which opened in October 2023 in Fullerton’s Amerige Town Center near Sunny Hills, offers eye-catching neon lights and Instagram-worthy decorations for those looking for Korean street food.

Korean restaurants like Pelicana or BBQ Chicken in Buena Park that offer fried chicken as its main course usually serve it without any special sides unless ordered separately. 

But in the recently opened I Got My Sound Chicken restaurant in the Amerige Heights Town Center, where many Sunny Hills students head to before school, during lunch and after school, the owners have come up with something different to add —  donuts.

Drizzled generously with sweet sauce, the plate contains two caramelized donuts topped with classic fried chicken and a hint of chives to finish this one-of-a-kind combination.

I Got My Sound Chicken, which replaced the Korean-Chinese street food dining place called Red Duck, held its grand opening on Friday, Oct. 6 and since then, it has attracted a fair number of customers, many of whom are students and part of the younger generation.

Alongside its best-selling Donut Chicken Caramel ($13.88) and Original Pop fried chicken ($29.99), it also offers spicy recommended entrees such as the Apple Topoki ($16.99) and basic Jjolmyeon ($14.99).

Popular sides include the anchovy fries ($8.99), Gim Mari ($3.99), and Loaded Samba Fries ($9.99).

Lathered in deep red sauce, the Apple Topoki ($16.99) serves a significantly spicy flavor with a side of gimari, crispy seaweed noodle rolls.

With its self-developed marinade, brine and secret powder used for the chicken, the restaurant offers nine distinct flavors ranging from classic to unique. A hit menu item is the Gim Ballad ($33.99), one of the premium chicken covered in a seaweed and chex mix.  

During a visit to the restaurant on Wednesday, Nov. 27, the Apple Topoki, anchovy fries and the Original Pop chicken were ordered.

The Apple Topoki comes with a dark red sauce filled to the brim of the plate. The rice cakes’ softness makes them easy to chew, and the cheese on top balances out the spicy sauce. The sweet taste of the thinly chopped apples incorporated into the dish helps dull out the overpowering spice.

To pair with the topoki, servers bring the separate dish of anchovy fries in a tall basket strainer with a long handle. Tossed in garlic oil, the soft anchovy taste makes it a great option as a side to any entree on the menu. Unlike other fast food fries, the touch of salt allows the flavor of the anchovy to stand out.

Lastly, the Original Pop chicken has a crispy outside with tender meat inside that falls right off the bone, proving it was fresh out of the hot fryer. 

If customers want to order only part of the chicken, visitors can opt to order just half instead for half the price, depending on what type. Additionally, for those who wish to order a smaller portion, the menu serves original fried chicken wings of six ($7.99) to 20 pieces ($24.99).

Beside the variety of records collaged on the wall, a traditional seating area is offered in the corner of the restaurant.

The restaurant’s vibrant decorations differ from other businesses in the area.

With bright neon LED lights rimmed across the walls and disco balls hanging from the ceiling, the restaurant replicates a retro aesthetic, with orange as its signature color to attract young customers.

Old record albums taped on the wall match the animated vibe of the restaurant. Customers can come in for the Instagram-worthy photo zone to make lasting memories with friends and family.

In addition to a typical wooden chair seating in the restaurant, customers can choose traditional Korean seating, typically sitting on a cushion with shoes off. It is on an elevated floor in front of a low table, which can provide more comfort to older guests who are used to traditional seating positions.

Compared to other common Korean chicken restaurants, this place is more likely to stand out with its attractive interior and diverse menu. The reasonable prices make the place friendly and approachable for younger generations. Essentially, this distinctive restaurant is a great dining place for Sunny Hills students to visit with their peers after school.

That’s definitely sound advice for all.

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About the Contributor
Claire Lee, Staff Reporter
Junior Claire Lee enters The Accolade as a staff reporter after taking the Journalism 1 class during her sophomore year. Lee has written stories for the cub issue in the previous year, seeing it as a great opportunity to improve her writing skills and interact with the other staff members. Lee also participates in Link Crew, volunteer organizations outside of school and several clubs on campus. In her free time, she prefers to spend her time doing art and hanging out with friends.
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